Education in the Age of the Technologist

This video presentation was originally given at Bar Camp Orlando 2015 on April 18, 2015. Why do some technology solutions seem to work in education while others don’t? Where are MOOCs missing the mark? Education in the Age of the Technologist by Joe Bustillos Written, Presented & Edited by Joe Bustillos “NASDAQ” from Smartsound Music (smartsound.com) Young Girl at School Holding a Computer Mouse — … Continue reading Education in the Age of the Technologist

The Unfortunate Consequence of Ignoring Small Group & Classroom Dynamics

My girlfriend, Maggie, and I were talking about optimal class sizes, me from my 19-years as an educator and she from her experiences as a lifelong student and being around her kids’ schools. When I taught in face-to-face environments with elementary and middle school students in Southern California, 25 to 30 students was a pretty good number to work with, assuming that there would be … Continue reading The Unfortunate Consequence of Ignoring Small Group & Classroom Dynamics

iBooks Author & the Post-Website World

I just finished taking an extensive tutorial on the Apple product iBooks Author and it really got me thinking about the post website world. What I mean is that Apple has been trying for decades to create the right combination of tools to enable their users to unleash their creativity on the world. Among other problems, the chief conduit of sharing this creativity has been a mode of communication that was primarily designed to make it possible for scholars to access each others’ papers. In other words, from its inception, the Internet has a narrow set of tools meant to share text or highly compressed versions of other media. It’s remarkable how much can be shared via such small pipes and such non-artist-friendly tools. Apple’s last tool, iWeb, attempted to bridge the kind of page-layout tools used for magazines and graphic design with the limitations of html and the Internet. But as easy as these tools were to use I think Apple discovered that everyone did want to take pictures and make videos, but no one wanted to go through the hassle of putting up a website to post their creative works. But what could not be controlled on the Internet was quite a different thing if one were to use tablets, specifically iPads, as the means of sharing… But, realistically, we’re still dealing with more hassle than most are willing to deal with. I don’t think Apple cares about that or is under any delusion that the vast majority of wanna-be photographers or videographers are going to rush to iBooks Author to share their works. I think that tools like iPhoto and iMovie and the iPhone and iPad will continue to serve the needs of folks who just want to whip out the pictures from the weekend trip or videos from the vacation and YouTube and Facebook will continue to be the easiest way to share one’s work with friends and family. But what happens when one wants to create something more than snapshots from the weekend or something more involved than a 90-second video of the baby dancing? I know this problem well.

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Too Much Information: The Value of Organized Education in the Era of Everything on the Internet

In June of 2008, when I first began working at Full Sail, I ran across an article about a Texas professor who decided to make his whole course available online because he believed that just having access to the course materials was not nearly as important as access to the professor or the learning community. I copied the link down, but when I later went … Continue reading Too Much Information: The Value of Organized Education in the Era of Everything on the Internet